Package Details: vlang-bin 0.4.5-1

Git Clone URL: https://aur.archlinux.org/vlang-bin.git (read-only, click to copy)
Package Base: vlang-bin
Description: Simple, fast, safe, compiled language for developing maintainable software (binary release)
Upstream URL: https://vlang.io
Keywords: language programming v vlang
Licenses: MIT
Conflicts: v, vlang, vlang-git
Provides: vlang
Submitter: ragouel
Maintainer: Chewing_Bever
Last Packager: Chewing_Bever
Votes: 4
Popularity: 0.046459
First Submitted: 2020-03-17 22:41 (UTC)
Last Updated: 2024-03-21 10:02 (UTC)

Dependencies (4)

Required by (7)

Sources (1)

Pinned Comments

lberrymage commented on 2021-01-20 05:09 (UTC) (edited on 2021-01-20 05:09 (UTC) by lberrymage)

The only way I was able to make it run, was to grant 777 recursively on /usr/lib/vlang/cmd, which is a potential security risk. Use at your own risk.

We should be able to solve the chmod 777 problem once upstream cuts a new release. See this commit.

ragouel commented on 2020-06-13 02:07 (UTC)

The only way I was able to make it run, was to grant 777 recursively on /usr/lib/vlang/cmd, which is a potential security risk. Use at your own risk.

Latest Comments

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lberrymage commented on 2021-01-20 05:09 (UTC) (edited on 2021-01-20 05:09 (UTC) by lberrymage)

The only way I was able to make it run, was to grant 777 recursively on /usr/lib/vlang/cmd, which is a potential security risk. Use at your own risk.

We should be able to solve the chmod 777 problem once upstream cuts a new release. See this commit.

1ace commented on 2021-01-02 13:20 (UTC) (edited on 2021-01-02 13:25 (UTC) by 1ace)

@chovy: you seem to be misunderstanding the point of v up and what a package manager is and does. I encourage you to read up on those, and you'll understand why you must never run v up (unless you want to break your system) :)

Edit (to be clearer): v up does have a reason to exist, as it is useful in two cases: when you don't have a package manager (eg. on Windows), or if you don't want to (or can't) install v system-wide (eg. you are on the someone else's machine and you don't have permission to install packages, so you just install v in your user's home folder).

chovy commented on 2021-01-02 13:02 (UTC)

sudo v up still updated it. I guess that is newer than what yay -S vlang-bin installs.

lberrymage commented on 2021-01-02 11:00 (UTC)

@chovy It requires sudo because this package installs v in a system directory which requires superuser permissions to write to. This shouldn't be a problem if you're using this package though since you should upgrade via pacman, not v up.

chovy commented on 2021-01-02 01:15 (UTC)

How come v up requires sudo v up to work? The vlang guys say this shouldn't be required.

1ace commented on 2020-12-26 10:14 (UTC)

Adding to my out-of-date message, sed s/0.1.29/0.2/ -i PKGBUILD && updpkgsums && mksrcinfo is enough to update the package :)

ragouel commented on 2020-07-20 16:25 (UTC)

@lberrymage Touch away...

lberrymage commented on 2020-07-20 16:02 (UTC)

Oh wait... this is the -bin package. The other workaround is to touch each binary in the cmd/tools directory so their mtime is later than that of their respective source code.

ragouel commented on 2020-07-20 07:28 (UTC)

@lberrymage I modified the patch offsets but 777 permissions are still needed.