Package Details: xcape-git 1:1.1.r9.gf3802fc-2

Git Clone URL: https://aur.archlinux.org/xcape-git.git (read-only)
Package Base: xcape-git
Description: Use modifier pressed/released solo as another key/chord, e.g. CapsLock > Escape
Upstream URL: https://github.com/alols/xcape
Keywords: CapsLock Escape keybinding modifier vim XKB
Licenses: GPL3
Conflicts: xcape
Provides: xcape
Submitter: gregf
Maintainer: joetw
Last Packager: joetw
Votes: 26
Popularity: 0.191412
First Submitted: 2012-04-01 19:46
Last Updated: 2015-06-17 10:44

Dependencies (2)

Required by (0)

Sources (1)

Latest Comments

joetw commented on 2013-04-11 08:03

This is a tiny tool to change the behaviour of modifier keys in X. You can set up a modifier key – when it's pressed and released on its own – to send an arbitrary key (or key chord) instead. (Technically, xcape cannot suppress the original modifier but merely generates the new key event afterwards. Usually, this causes no harm because applications ignore most solitary modifier events.)

Xcape takes effect after any changes you may have set up with XKB or Xmodmap.

Example: Vim users need Escape much more often than Caps Lock and also need Control sometimes.

1. Swap Caps Lock with Left Control, e. g.:

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Keyboard_configuration_in_Xorg#Swapping_Caps_Lock_with_Left_Control

2. Then run xcape. By default, the logical Left Control (= physical Caps Lock) will now produce Escape when pressed and released on its own. It will still work as Left Control when pressed as part of a key chord.

joetw commented on 2013-04-11 07:57

Vim users: See below.

Old users: The package has a new version numbering scheme.

New users: What xcape is good for:

It's a tiny tool that can change the behaviour of modifier keys in X. You can set it up so that a modifier key - when it's pressed and released on its own - sends an arbitrary key (or key chord) instead.

This takes effect after any changes you may have set up with Xmodmap.

Example: Vim users need to press <Esc> much more often than <CapsLock>, so some use Xmodmap to swap those two modifiers. But they also need <Control> fairly often (like pretty much anybody). So what you can do instead is this:

Use Xmodmap to swap <Control_L> and <CapsLock>. Then use xcape to have the logical <Control_L> (= physical <CapsLock>) produce <Esc> when pressed and released on its own. It will still work as <Control_L> when pressed as part of a key chord.

Make sure to read the README and the documentation of Xmodmap. As far as I understand it, the Xmodmap syntax "keycode any = Escape" is well suited for the caveat mentioned in the README.

joetw commented on 2013-04-11 07:55

Vim users: See below.

Old users: The package has a new version numbering scheme.

New users: What xcape is good for:

It's a tiny tool that can change the behaviour of modifier keys in X. You can set it up so that a modifier key - when it's pressed and released on its own - sends an arbitrary key (or key chord) instead.

This takes effect after any changes you may have set up with Xmodmap.

Example: Vim users need to press <Esc> much more often than <CapsLock>, so some use Xmodmap to swap those two modifiers. But they also need <Control> fairly often (like pretty much anybody). So what you can do instead is this:

Use Xmodmap to swap <Control_L> and <CapsLock>. Then use xcape to have the logical <Control_L> (= physical <CapsLock>) produce <Esc> when pressed and released on its own. It will still work as <Control_L> when pressed as part of a key chord.

Make sure to read the README and the documentation of Xmodmap. As far as I understand it, the Xmodmap syntax "keycode any = Escape" is well suited for the caveat mentioned in the README.

joetw commented on 2013-04-11 07:53

Vim users: See below.

Old users: The package has a new version numbering scheme.

New users: What xcape is good for:

It's a tiny tool that can change the behaviour of modifier keys in X. You can set it up so that a modifier key - when it's pressed and released on its own - sends an arbitrary key (or key chord) instead.

This takes effect after any changes you may have set up with Xmodmap.

Example: Vim users need to press <Esc> much more often than <CapsLock>, so some use Xmodmap to swap those two modifiers. But they also need <Control_L> fairly often (like pretty much anybody). So what you can do instead is this:

Use Xmodmap to swap <Control_L> and <CapsLock>. Then use xcape to have the logical <Control-L> (= physical <CapsLock>) produce <Esc> when pressed and released on its own. It will still work as <Control_L> when pressed as part of a key chord.

Make sure to read the README and the documentation of Xmodmap. As far as I understand it, the Xmodmap syntax "keycode any = Escape" is well suited for the caveat mentioned in the README.

joetw commented on 2013-04-08 13:45

I'll wait a bit if anyone qualified steps up. Otherwise, I'll try to learn about pkgbuilds etc.

gregf commented on 2013-04-08 12:43

@joetw I'm not using Arch anymore. I disowned the package so you could take it over, if you want.

joetw commented on 2013-04-08 12:10

Would you update the package? Thanks.